Saturday, 7 November 2009

Quince Bakewell Pudding

You may remember that last year I made marmalade from our ornamental quinces. This year our crop was a lot smaller (the knobbly one is from the bonsai quince that Captain Haddock is growing) and I decided to try something different.

My plan was to peel and core them, poach them until tender in a sugar syrup and then preserve them in brandy. Well that didn't really work out at all. They collapsed in the sugar syrup into a fragrant mush, which then set into a very firm, tangy jam.

I decided to turn the jam into a classic English pastry - the Bakewell Pudding. The difference between a Bakewell Tart and a Bakewell Pudding is that the tart uses shortcrust and the pudding uses puff. There are probably other differences but that is the main one.

I followed this recipe, substituting a thick layer of quince jam for the raspberries and omitting the almond essence.

Delicious. Not too sweet, not too heavy, just a really delicious combination of fruit and almonds. With a hefty spoonful of clotted cream, naturally!

13 comments:

HH said...

Looks and sounds delicious FC! Good thinking using the unexpected jam so well!

Natashya KitchenPuppies said...

Sounds good! I have never had quince before.

George Gaston said...

Quince is something we don't see much in the US, but I absolutely love them. I am definitely going to try and get some to try your wonderful recipes. Thanks

Foodycat said...

HH - thanks! I thought I was pretty clever...

Natashya - they are a very old-fashioned fruit, with a lovely fragrance

George - good luck! These are the chaenomeles ornamental quince, not as fragrant but also with a smoother textured flesh.

mangocheeks said...

I have never had quince. This does look truly scrummy.

The Cat's Mother said...

did they change colour to that pale red?
I think home-grown is the way to go as the shop ones I last got were quite woody - they didn't collapse anywhere.
The tart looks delicious.

mscrankypants said...

I love how the unassuming quince yields such beautiful fruit. The pudding looks superb and I haven't had proper clotted cream for years.

girlichef said...

Sounds good. I don't think I've ever even had a quince. Huh.

Heather said...

that pie looks delightful! i've never had quince, other than in jelly form. it looks yummy ;)

Foodycat said...

Mangocheeks - thanks for visiting my blog! I've noticed that quinces are quite hard to come by in the UK.

Mother - they sure did! Lovely amber colour.

Cranky - I don't understand why Australia doesn't do clotted cream. It is so good!

Girli Heather - oh well, I haven't tried tres leches!

Heather - I think as jelly it is pretty hard to beat!

Johanna said...

I have similar tart with quince and almonds scheduled for next week. Anything with quince is a must this time of the year!

kat said...

Beautiful tart. I made my first Bakewell Tart this year for some visiting Brits, I was nervous but they all loved it

Foodycat said...

Johanna - quince is very popular in Greece, isn't it?

Kat - I'm sure you did fine!

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