Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Calamondin dreaming

All the leaves are brown, and the sky is grey...

Paul's calamondin bonsai, on the other hand, is covered in beautiful orange fruit, glowing like little suns. Very cheering as the end of winter nears.


The fruit are a bit fiddly, really. Small, lots of pips and a very thin skin. I was at a bit of a loss as to what to do with them, so I boiled a pile of them for about 15 minutes, then pureed and strained them, yielding about a cupful of bright orange, intensely perfumed and flavoured pulp. Which I stuck in the freezer until inspiration took hold.

The arrival of some inexpensive nectarines provided that inspiration. I roasted them with a little sugar and a squeeze of calamondin juice to concentrate their flavour.


I turned the boiled calamondin puree into a bowl of calamondin curd. I used this Nigel Slater recipe for it.

I poured most of the calamondin curd over my roasted nectarines, then topped them with whipped cream and broken meringues for another take on the classic Eton Mess.


The rest of the curd was dolloped onto hot, fresh scones.


But the little bonsai wouldn't take a hint, and keeps on putting out more fruit. Another pile became a version of duck a l'orange (of which I apparently didn't take a picture). Then the next pile became a drizzle cake. On Sunday another pile provided the tart edge to a bloody mary (and you really don't need pictures of that).


The season for them is almost over. Pretty soon the conservatory will be filled with the heady scent of their blossom again. Can't wait, but I will miss the fruit!

15 comments:

leaf (the indolent cook) said...

Jealous of your plentiful calamondin harvest! Such great ways to use them up, too.

Suelle said...

I think my neighbour's tree has died - I haven't had any calamondin fruit from her for a while.

The curd is a lovely idea, and the Mess looks delicious - I usually use the purée in one of the (whole boiled fruit)orange and almond cake recipes.

Kavey said...

Ooh they'd be perfect for candying whole, as I did with both regular clementines and baby tangerines, recently. Blogged it, should you want to try it.

They're cute, how wonderful to get that kind of harvest at home!

hungryandfrozen said...

I too am jealous of the calamondins, I've never heard of them before. Gorgeous! That curd/Eton Mess sounds just wonderful.

Foodycat said...

Leaf - thank you!

Suelle - I was thinking of that, but then Weazel voted drizzle cake. So I had to grate the little buggers.

Kavey - I saw that, but they are so pippy, it wouldn't be nice to eat whole.

Laura - they are often called kalamansi. Very common in Malaysia and Singapore.

Angie's Recipes said...

That's a really fresh and delightful dessert.

Su-Lin said...

OMG! And you're growing a calamansi plant in your house? Do they require a lot of work? I LOVE calamansi limes!

~~louise~~ said...

I'm puckering as we speak. Heavenly, simply heavenly. You lucky, lucky girl! I'm still waiting for my tiny Pineapple plant to do something, anything!

Thanks for sharing, Foodycat:)

tori said...

I love the idea of a Bonsai that wouldn't take a hint. The curd looks absolutely divine.

Simona said...

What an interesting-looking little fruit. I can see that you put your harvest to excellent use.

Foodycat said...

Angie - thanks!

Su-Lin - they are quite greedy, so a lot of fertiliser, but not a whole lot of other work unless you are shaping and wiring a bonsai.

Louise - pineapple! Wow!

Tori - this one is very prolific.

Simona - thanks! We enjoyed every bit of it.

tasteofbeirut said...

Learned about a new citrus! Looks lovely! Will be looking for this bonsai tree around here.

Deb in Hawaii said...

It looks like you are making great use of them. When I used to travel in The Philippines, the hotel we stayed out had fresh calamansi juice and lots of calamansi pastries--I miss the flavor. ;-)

Mary said...

This was such a good idea. You created several delicious dishes using fruit that most would have tossed away. To be honest this was the first time I had heard of it. I love to visit here. I never leave empty handed and always have an idea or recipe when I leave. I hope you are having a good day. Blessings...Mary

C said...

I love the idea of the curd and the Eton mess, such a delicious way to make the most of your harvest!

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